Doing it backwards.

Got a tip about a company looking for scripts based on existing work (novels, short stories, comic books, etc.). Unfortunately, while I have plenty of all of those things sitting around, I don’t have a script for a feature based on something already-published.

“Damn,” thought I, having to pass on the opportunity. “Gotta fix that.”

So, looks like I might take one of my existing scripts and turn it into a novel. Sort of doing it backwards, I know, but I love the screenplay
(it’s a bloody ’80s horror flick brought to life), and I think it’d make a
great book. Plus, heck, I don’t even have to outline the thing—it’s already a script. What better outline could I ask for?

Got a couple of short stories I have to wrap up first, but could very well be that the next book project is nailed down. Will keep you
updated as progress continues, but in the meantime, check out my new anthology, Grave Choices. It has stories collected from other books that I have the rights to again, some neat comic book stuff with the prose versions of those stories, and a bunch of brand new material, including the novella, “Morland”. More on the new writing projects soon.

Grave Choices Cover

Blind Filmmaker’s Anthology Tackles Hard Choices

Domestic abuse, infidelity, betrayal, gang violence among themes examined in new collection

(CAPE CORAL, FL) Joseph M. Monks knows a thing or two about packing his fiction with a punch. Recognized as a splatterpunk forerunner for his work on the underground cult comic CRY FOR DAWN, Monks’ work has been used as course material in college classrooms; he’s been a featured lecturer on writing and horror at international conventions; over 13 million copies of his stories are currently in print and he’s broken barriers previously unchallenged-the world’s first blind film director, and an award-winner at that.

Grave Choices, Monks’ third anthology, covers a myriad of current-event topics, spanning fantasy, urban decay, supernatural horror, murder-for-hire and more. The overarching theme, as the title suggests, is hard decisions, and naturally, their consequences.

“Everyone makes tough choices,” says Monks. “That’s something we all share. Sometimes, they affect you for the rest of your life, often in a bad way. Using that as the genesis for the book allowed me to explore any subject I wanted, which is what makes this one so diverse.”

Grave Choices is available on Kindle through Media Services Innovations, Inc., and will be released for Nook in the Fall.

[Media: To request a review copy, set up an interview, or for more information about Monks or his work, please e-mail publicist Billy Martindale at: pr @ mediasi . com]

Joe Monks & Billy Martindale on Stage

Blind Film Director’s First Gig as a Musician

Blind director and writer Joseph M. Monks can’t seem to sit down. Among his most recent endeavours was picking up the guitar. Over Memorial Day weekend he took the stage at Backstreets Sports Bar.

It was a birthday present for his mother that was supposed to happen last November, but health issues forced Monks into the hospital. 

“Back in November (Black Friday, to be exact), we were going to pack the bar, sneak my Mom out for dinner, and then bring her to Backstreets, where I was going to pull this exact same stunt,” Monks said. “She’d never heard me play, except on YouTube, so this was going to be quite the surprise.”

Unfortunately, a viral infection floored Monks the week of Black Friday and put him in the hospital for a week. 

When a new date was available, Monks, along with guitarist/singer Billy Martindale and bass player John Fairfield delivered the goods to a packed bar. Monks’ mother had no idea what was going on, and spent the bulk of the time wiping tears.


Here are the first three videos from the gig.  We’ll be posting more of them in the coming weeks.

Shooting Bad Moon Rising

Joe Monks’ String Trauma [VIDEO]

It’s been a week of firsts, fun and bloody fingers.

Joseph M. Monks, along with cohorts singer/guitarist Billy Martindale and bass player John Fairfield, took to a home-shoot of Bad Moon Rising. In a few hours they converted a living room into an on-the-fly studio, using a green screen, three iPhones, a Peavy sound system and multiple vintage guitars.

The idea was a quick project akin to “Pop Up Video”, but the real treat was John busting out a ’74 Rickenbacker. Billy jammed with a ’68 Fender Jaguar and a ’70s era Ovation electric/acoustic. Joe was strumming an Epiphone, and can’t wait till he gets to play another buddy’s ’77 Aria.

 

Joe had this to say about the shoot: “My fingers are, no BS, bloody. Bad enough I chew my nails down to nothing (habit formed from years of wearing hockey gloves), but after 3+ hours on Monday afternoon, another hour at home late Monday night, 4+ hours and multiple takes of the same songs over and over? Yikes. I may use one of the nicest strings on the market (Elixir ultra light 10s), but if you’re only an intermediate player who doesn’t gig and is just learning new songs to play in the backyard or at the beach? Almost 9 hours in a 24 hour span is not your usual routine.”

Be sure to let us know what you think.